Jim
Dine


Works

Prints

A Beautiful Heart


31’’ x 25’’, Ed. AP

A Heart on the Rue de Grenelle


32 1/8’’ x 26 1/4’’ Ed. AP

Ball-Grained Heart


50’’ x 37 1/2’’, Ed. 16

Behind the Thicket


12 1/2’’ x 21 1/4’’, Ed. 75

Big Checkered Pinocchio


59 3/4’’ x 44 3/4’’, Ed. 12

Bill Clinton


12 3/8’’ x 10 1/8’’, Ed. 17 AP

Dexter’s Four Robes


25’’ x 21’’

Ex Voto


40’’ x 53 1/2’’, Ed. 30

Fear in Color


55 1/4’’ x 29’’, Ed. 11

Fourteen Color Woodcut Bathrobe


77 3/8’’ x 42 Ed. AP

Fresh, French and Beautiful


21 5/8’’ x 17 3/4’’ Ed. AP

Grease, Bone and Color


41 3/8’’ x 39’’, Ed. 21

Hart in Blu


27 1/4’’ x 22 5/8’’ Ed. AP

July on the Palouse


70 1/2’’ x 48’’, Ed. 16

Lakeside


41 1/4’’ x 33’’ Ed. 30

L.A. Eye Works


43 1/4’’ x 37 1/8’’ Ed. AP

Owl


20’’ x 14 1/2’’, Ed. 20

Owl in the Kitchen


35 1/2’’ x 27 3/4’’, Ed. 16

Pinocchio / Lincoln Center


37’’ x 27’’, Ed. 18

Raven on White Paper


53 5/8’’ x 42 1/2’’, Ed. 15

Red Light


38’’ x 29 1/2’’, Ed. 12

Remembering Wallace Ting


49’’ x 37 3/8’’, Ed. AP

Robe with Wasp Nest


35’’ x 27’’, Ed. 14

Tartan Pants


63’’ x 48’’, Ed. 18

Technicolor


19 3/4’’ x 25 5/8’’, Ed. 25

The Black and Red Heart


63 3/4’’ x 47 1/2’’, Ed. 30

The Colorful Wall


45’’ x 37 1/2’’ Ed. AP

The Cottonwoods at Night


64’’ x 47 1/2’’, Ed. 24

Two Florida Bathrobes


24’’ x 18’’ Ed. 70

The Henry Street Robes


17 3/4’’ x 25 3/8’’

The New Building


64’’ x 47 1/2’’, Ed. 30

The Orange Birthday Robe


54 1/2’’ x 38 1/2’’, Ed. 28

The Soft Ground


18 3/8’’ x 24 1/4’’, Ed. 14

White Owl (For Alan)


56 1/2’’ x 29 1/4’’, Ed. 20

Women and Water


38 3/4’’ x 33 1/8’’, Ed. 14

Yellow Watercolours


55 1/2’’ x 41 1/8’’ Ed. AP

Zein Robe


54 9/64’’ x 37’’, Ed. 11

9 Studies for Winter Dream (Cat)


13’’ x 10’’, Ed. 40

9 Studies for Winter Dream (Crow)


13’’ x 10’’, Ed. 40

9 Studies for Winter Dream (Mask)


13’’ x 10’’, Ed. 40

9 Studies for Winter Dream (Owl)


13’’ x 10’’, Ed. 40

9 Studies for Winter Dream (Top Hat)


13’’ x 10’’, Ed. 40

9 Studies for Winter Dream (Complete Portfolio of Nine Prints)


13’’ x 10’’, Ed. 40

64 Blocks


62’’ x 47’’, Ed. 21

The Tide of Debt


78 3/4’’ x 51 3/16’’

Sculptures

Bouquet


54’’ x 27’’ x 25’’, Ed. 6

Five Colorful Dancers


39’’ x 63’’ x 29’’, Ed. 6

Large Parrot Screams Color


144’’ x 82’’ x 65’’, Ed. 6

Model for the Boräs Monument


25 3/4’’ x 22’’ x 13 3/4’’, Ed. 6

New Other Heart on a Rock


37 3/4’’ x 20 1/4’’ x 19’’, Ed. 4 AP

Pinocchio Bust


43’’ x 10’’ x 9’’, Ed. 8

Roman Red Venus


62’’ x 20’’ x 18’’, Ed. 8

Roman Red Venus (the Blue Patina)


62’’ x 20’’ x 18’’, Ed. 8

The Brothers and Sisters


66’’ x 46 1/2’’ x 32 1/2’’, Ed. 6

The Heart Called, ’’After the Flood’’


89’’ x 78’’ x 36’’, Ed. 6

Two Pinocchios in Blue


31 1/2’’ x 28’’ x 19 1/2’’, Ed. 8

Walking to Boräs (Short Steps)


70’’ x 40 1/2’’ x 38 1/2’’, Ed. 6

Tools + Fire


93’’ x 108’’ x 63’’, Ed. 6

Three Hearts on the Rocks


78’’ x 165’’ x 78’’, Ed. 3AP

Ex Voto


66’’ x 125 ¾’’ x 46 ½’’, Ed. 6


Biography

Born in Cincinnati in 1935, Jim Dine is a major post-war artist whose work ranges from vibrant, large-scale paintings to exquisitely-rendered, romantic drawings and bronze sculpture. Representative of the American Pop Art movement, Dine was first known for Action Painting, bringing to this form of art improvised theatrical aspects. In 1958, while he lived in New York, he responded to abstract expressionism by building installations and organizing happenings.

The deep enthusiasm following Dine’s immersion into the New York art scene was followed by deep skepticism. This uncertainty lead him to confront himself to a more traditional painting, which will led him to recklessness and gaiety of chromaticism but also the “Heart”, which will become his favorite pattern. Often colorful, his paintings use the melted technique (blurred outlines) and series, with endless variations especially in chromatic shades. The skull, found in his paintings as a reminder in the midst of many ordinary and everyday objects of the contemporary world, revives the tradition of still life.

In the works that best characterize his work, we also witness the game between the real object and the painted object, a game of trompe-l’oeil. According to him, the canvas is the last “point of contact to unreality” while the object, a symbol of life, remains mostly a concrete object.

In the 1980s, he devoted himself more to sculpture. Since then, he seems to find his models more in nature than in objects made by humans. In his painting, Jim Dine combines collages, assemblages and objects, and thus emphasizes the personal and manual nature of his work, which sets him apart from the more mechanical aesthetics of Pop Art.

In 2019, Jim Dine was appointed the Chevalier de l’Ordre de la Légion d’honneur of France.

Download the artist biography